Text: Fewer Dressing Changes: Better for the patient and the bottom line

Fewer Dressing Changes: Better for the Patient and the Bottom Line

Frequent Dressing Disruptions Vascular access dressing disruptions occur frequently during vascular access device (VAD) maintenance, leading to premature dressing changes. This issue has been examined by multiple studies. According to a study undertaken by Timsit, et al., approximately 67% of central venous catheter (CVC) dressing changes are performed before the planned date.1 This can be…

Text: Gum Mastic: What is it and why do I need it for my vascular access dressings?

Gum Mastic: What is it and why do I need it for my vascular access dressings?

Are you struggling with maintaining intact vascular access dressings for up to 7 days as recommended by the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice? If so, consider the use of gum mastic to enhance dressing adherence!1 In the brief video below, S. Matthew Gibson RN, CRNI, VA-BC, CPUI shows the simple application process of Mastisol® Liquid…

Text: Improving Vascular Access Dressing Integrity Without Increased Skin Injury Risk

Improving Vascular Access Dressing Integrity Without Increased Skin Injury Risk

Maintaining Dressing Integrity to Prevent Infection Maintaining clean, dry, intact dressings over vascular access devices (VADs) is fundamental to site care. The 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice recommend that transparent dressings be changed at least every 7 days. However, if the dressing is disrupted ‐ meaning loose, wet, or soiled – the standards recommend…

Vascular Dressing Wear Time: The Gap between Guidelines and Practices

Vascular Dressing Wear Time: The Gap between Guidelines and Practices

Guidelines for Dressing Wear Time and Maintenance Guidelines for vascular access dressings focus on improving both wear time and dressing integrity. Maintaining intact dressings is important for preventing infection and minimizing risk of skin injury. It can also reduce unnecessary dressing changes and help wear time more closely match standard parameters. According to the 2021…

Device and Dressing Securement: Updated Practices Recommendations in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice

Device and Dressing Securement: Updated Practice Recommendations in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice

The newly released 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has been substantially updated from the previous edition. Continuing to improve and standardize practice based on evidence improves patient quality of care and boosts efficiency at the same time. The Standards are rich with many new or refined practice recommendations, based on the ever-evolving…

3 Questions with Marcia Ryder, PhD, MS, RN

3 Questions with Marcia Ryder, PhD, MS, RN 3 Questions With… features some of the finest thought leaders in healthcare specialties such as Infection Prevention, Vascular Access, Surgical Care and more. These experts answer questions on the latest insights, evidence and current practices. For our newest 3 Questions With… vlog, Eloquest Healthcare is proud to feature…

3 Questions with Lee Steere, RN, CRNI, VA-BC

3 Questions with Lee Steere, RN, CRNI, VA-BC 3 Questions With… features some of the finest thought leaders in healthcare specialties such as Infection Prevention, Vascular Access, Surgical Care and more. These experts answer questions on the latest insights, evidence and current practices. For our newest 3 Questions With… Eloquest Healthcare is proud to feature Lee Steere,…

Modern Vascular Access with Dr. Jack LeDonne – Recommendations to Improve Site Care & Maintenance

Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are deadly, associated with 12 to 25% mortality among the critical care patient population.1 Published guidance for preventing CRBSIs recommends a bundled approach for eliminating known risks. Multiple organizations, including the CDC, have published evidence based guidelines for preventing CRBSIs.2 However, little has changed regarding device care and maintenance. Jack LeDonne,…

Improving Vascular Access Dressing Integrity with Gum Mastic Adhesive

Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) occurrence is arguably 100% preventable, yet central venous access device (CVAD) related infections have a 12-25% mortality rate in the ICU setting1. One to 2 of every 8 patients who develop CLABSI don’t survive. In the webinar, 18 Months of Sticking to it: Dedicated team site care using gum mastic…

Reducing CLABSI and MARSI Risk Through Improved Vascular Access Dressing Integrity

Vascular Access Dressing Adherence and Hospital-acquired Infections Central venous access device (CVAD) related infections have a 12‐25% mortality in ICU populations. [1] Due to dressing disruption, central line‐associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) may occur. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) agree that vascular access device (VAD) dressing…